Tuesday, March 20, 2012

Expletives

 www.trifectawritingchallenge.com








This week's Trifecta word is:

clean (adjective)

1: free from dirt or pollution
2: unadulterated, pure
3 a : free from moral corruption or sinister connections of any kind <a candidate with a clean record>
 b : free from offensive treatment of sexual subjects and from the use of obscenity <a clean joke>
 c : observing the rules : fair <a clean fight>

Please remember:
  1. Your response must be between 33 and 333 words.
  2. You must use the 3rd definition of the given word in your post.
  3. The word itself needs to be included in your response.
  4. You may not use a variation of the word; it needs to be exactly as stated above.  (No cleaning, cleaned, cleans, cleaner, cleaning lady, etc.)
  5. Your post must include a link back to Trifecta.
  6. Please submit your post's permalink, not the main page of your blog.  For example: http://www.trifectawritingchallenge.com/2012/03/trifextra-week-eight.html not www.trifectawritingchallenge.com.

Expletives

Television bleeping is on the rise --
Too many obscenities we must disguise.
The Idol 'Bleep Stick' was graciously given
To the spontaneous, foul-mouthed judge, Steven.
Substituting with random punctuation marks
Is a frequent way to knowingly hallmark
Expletives that are not appropriate
For the eyes of young literates.

Some say it's overkill,
But to mommies, it fits the bill.
Because Notting Hill's character, Spike
Wears a T-shirt that most parents dislike.
Even when the bleeper is on,
One cannot prevent this unforeseeable one:
It's important to keep language clean,
Since an emergent reader will ask, "What does 'Fancy a Fuck' mean?"


22 comments:

  1. Being a grandparent now I couldn't agree with you more because I can't be in all my children's homes at the same time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Booguloo, I love your comments! I really should add 'grandparents' to 'parents' up there! Thanks for stopping by.

      Delete
  2. 2 comments - (1) my sentiments exactly; and (2) you are such a poet. :-)) And just a little anecdote - here at home, we have no TV, but we let the children watch Youtube and Hulu once in awhile. Alas! Even those places are no longer safe for kids. Advertisements have made inroads in these places and many of the ads are just not kid-friendly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Haha, my poems are all simple and silly, but thank you! This is really no big deal to many people, but when one becomes a parent, it IS such a big deal. All the rules change when there are pint-sized people running around! I cannot even begin to count the number of ads out there that are not suitable for kids...

      Delete
  3. I can remember one time (long ago and far away) when I was just learning to read and all full of myself and my accomplishments. My mother and sister and I were walking home and I read something written on the sidewalk in chalk . . . I never understood why I deserved to be backhanded. (until later)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, poor you! That is not your fault! I don't think you deserve it unless you knew better and said it on purpose! I'm sorry to bring back such an unpleasant memory, but thanks for commenting, Barbara!

      Delete
  4. I love your poem. I'm actually surprised at some of the words that don't get bleeped (especially in prime time TV).

    I chuckled at your last line...I wouldn't want to explain it to a new reader, that's for sure!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. More and more TV ads are becoming quite unsuitable for children these days. This happened quite by accident. It was a mouth-dropping moment, and a quick "language lesson" followed. =)

      Delete
  5. When I was pregnant for the first time I abandoned my swearing, all except the word bug... which I repeated when I needed to say something, as in bug..r, bug..r, bug..r, bug..r, in rapid-fire repetition. It wasn't until I heard my wee daughter repeating that in her play that I knew I had to give it up too. =) They are older now, 9, 7 and 5, and I've told the older two that it isn't so much swearing that I object to, but the inability to know the when and the where. I dislike so much of what "pop culture" imparts upon my children. We uninvited most of it into our house, and talk about the rest (Kei$ha singing beer beer beer with my children, for example. >.<)

    Great entry!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, pop culture is not friendly to young children! I recently wrote about 4-y-o son singing, "I'm sixty and I know it" in the most innocent way. I had to quickly prepare a carefully-crafted lesson regarding words and their appropriate uses.

      Delete
  6. fantastic. great entry. I couldn't agree with this more.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your comment! How we change our perspectives when we become parents!

      Delete
  7. My attitude toward censorship changed completely when children entered my life! I so get this (and I remember that shirt from Notting Hill).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That shirt was so funny... until this. Thank you for taking the time to read and comment!

      Delete
  8. Hilarious. Great poem. It made me laugh. I like how you used the prompt, too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Maybe we 'mommies' can relate to each other. Yours was one of my favorites. Thanks you!

      Delete
  9. This poem is fantastic. I watch Idol sometimes and love Steven's slip ups. I have a tendency towards expletives now that my kids are away at college (back to my old ways, I guess). Do they really think when they bleep things out that we can't read lips!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Expletives are okay, I think, when said in the right context to the right people. People must just try to remember who is in their audience. I've often had to walk my kids quickly away from a group of teenagers... I guess that's my job! Thank you!

      Delete
  10. Haha! I gotta say, this is a WAR at our house. I swear. I loathe bleeping. I think that it is inappropriate to lie to kids about words just because they might use them. My husband keeps waiting for our kids to embarass us in public. HE doesn't swear around the children.


    The kids have somehow learned what the bad words are and now gasp and say "Mommy, you said a bad word."

    To which I invariably reply, "You don't fucking say?"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ah, Jesterqueen, you crack me up! I don't think bleeping is lying about the words to children, since we all 'know' what they said. For me, hearing it over and over tells children that it's okay to use them. Profanity coming out of children's mouths is just out-of-place; they're either not using them correctly or are using them just to get attention. It's unnecessary. But it seems like when THE Jesterqueen uses it, it's brilliant!

      Delete
  11. Thank you for linking up to Trifecta this weekend. I love this. I watch my kids' exposure to media like a hound, so I get the argument. I absolutely love your conclusion though, so I guess that says something. Hope to see you back for the weekend challenge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Trifecta! You throw the line with the bait, and I'll reel myself in.

      Delete